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PATTERNMAKING SEWING

INTRODUCING THE MINI NOVA JUMPSUIT

September 3, 2020

We are so excited to be launching the mini version of the Nova Jumpsuit pattern today. Just like the adult version, the Mini Nova pattern is a knit, pull-on jumpsuit with no fiddly closures. It has four views. Views A and B have a wide elastic waistband and inseam pockets. Views C and D have a straight fit through the waist and attached front pockets. Views A and C are a short romper length while Views B and D are long with an elastic casing at the ankle.

This pattern works best in light to medium weight knits with at least 20% stretch. I prefer stable knits like cotton interlock or t-shirt jersey. You can also use slinkier knits like rayon or bamboo, just know that these fabrics have a tendency to grow as you sew them so you may need to size down, especially in the height, to accommodate.

The pattern is PDF only for now and is offered in size 2T-10.

The instructions, other than a different width of elastic, are just the same as the adult pattern. We will be doing a complete sewalong next week for all size ranges of the pattern. I hope you will join us!

You can find the pattern in our shop here.

PATTERNMAKING SEWING

INTRODUCING THE NOVA JUMPSUIT

July 29, 2020

A couple of months ago when I first started designing this pattern, we had just stared our Covid lockdown. The way I was dressing was starting to shift and what I needed didn’t exist in my wardrobe. I wanted a comfy, easy to throw on outfit that could double as both loungewear and daywear. As I started dreaming up what this might look like, the Nova started to form.

The Nova pattern is a knit, pull-on jumpsuit with no fiddly closures. It has four views. Views A and B have a wide elastic waistband and inseam pockets. Views C and D have a straight fit through the waist and attached front pockets. Views A and C are a short romper length while Views B and D are long with an elastic casing at the ankle.

The Nova is currently offered as PDF only. It comes in two size ranges – sizes 0 – 18 and a C cup and 14 – 30 and a D cup. You can access both size ranges from my site here.

We will talk more about fabric in later posts, but for now just know that this pattern works best in light to medium weight knits with at least 20% stretch. I prefer stable knits like cotton interlock or t-shirt jersey. You can also use slinkier knits like rayon or bamboo, just know that these fabrics have a tendency to grow as you sew them so you may need to size down, especially in the height, to accommodate.

There will be a full sewalong coming for the Nova in September when we release the mini version of this pattern. You can purchase the Nova here at 20% off (no code needed) through this Sunday.

SEWING

THE OGDEN IS NOW AVAILABLE IN SIZES 0-30

July 9, 2020

We are very excited to announce the update of our beloved Ogden cami sewing pattern to a more inclusive size range. The Ogden has always been our most popular pattern so we have not been surprised that we have had so many requests to make it available in more sizes. You can now purchase the pattern in a 0-18 size range with a C cup and 14-30 with a D cup (as well as a kids size range of 2T-10).

Because of the larger cup size, we widened the strap so it would easily cover a thicker bra strap and also added a bust dart for more shaping and room. The bust dart also comes in handy if you are interested in doing an additional FBA.

Other than that, the instructions and basic shape are the same as the 0-18 size range to keep it as close to the original design as possible.

If you have bought the Ogden from us in the past, you do not need to rebuy the extended range. You will be getting an email from us including the new size range for free. Please be patient as we send out emails over the next few days. If you think you should have gotten the email and have not, feel free to email us through our website so we can help.

You can find more information about the Ogden pattern including measurements and fabric recommendations through our shop here. You will find the Ogden pdf in sizes 14-30 is on sale (no code needed) through the end of the week.

OTHER SEWING TUTORIALS

SCOOP NECK RIO HACK

May 22, 2020

I am back today with another simple hack for the Rio pattern. Today I am going to show you how to create a scoop neck version of the pattern instead of the crew neck style that it comes with.

To create this pattern you are going to make adjustments to the main front and back pieces and also the neckband. The sleeve and sleeve band pattern pieces will not be changed at all.

First take the back pattern piece. You are going to want to widen the neck opening a bit so we will make the shoulder seam shorter. I decided to take 1″ off of the neck edge of the shoulder seam. This is on a size 8. You may want to make it a bit more or less depending on your size and the look you are going for.

Now draw a nice curved line back to the original back neck cut line. Be sure that the line that intersects with the shoulder seam is at a 90 degree angle. Trim your neck back neckline.

Just like you did on the back, make a mark 1″ (or whatever measurement you decided on) on the shoulder seam closest to the neckline.

Make another mark down the center front that will be for the depth of the scoop. I decided to mark 4″ down for this one. Next time I may increase that a bit, but this is personal preference.

Now, connect the two markings with a nice curved line, making sure that the beginning and end are perpendicular to the CF and shoulder seam.

Cut along your new neckline.

Measure your new front neckline and your new back neckline. Add them together, multiple by 2 and subtract 3/4″ for seam allowance (because of the way the Rio in constructed we only need to account for the front and back shoulder seam allowance of one shoulder seam). Then multiple this number by 70% (.7). This will be the new neckband length. Here is an example.

Back Neck (4.6″) + Front Neck (10″) = 14.6″ x 2 = 29.2 – Seam Allowance (.75″) = 28.45 x .7 = 19.92″

So I will cut my neckband as the same width as the original pattern but the length with be about 20″.

Now cut out all of your pattern pieces and sew it up.

The construction does not change at all from the original instructions.

That is it. I am so happy with the way this hack turned out. I already am planning to make a few more for easy summer wardrobe essentials. If you want to purchase the Rio pattern you can do so here.

SEWING TUTORIALS

BANDLESS SLEEVE RIO HACK

May 13, 2020

Today I have a very easy hack to share with you for the Rio Ringer T-shirt and Dress pattern. I know that not everyone loves the ringer style with that nod to the 70s and 80s. This hack shows you how to use the Rio pattern and adapt the sleeves slightly for a bandless, regular t-shirt sleeve. I also show you how I used another fitted long sleeve pattern to create a long sleeved Rio as well.

To create a short sleeved Rio with no band we will need to adjust the sleeve pattern slightly. Everything else is the same. Take your sleeve pattern piece and add 1 inch to the length. This will accommodate the length that you lose when not using the band and also adds a bit of length to turn under for the sleeve hem.

Now sew up your Rio according to the directions, omitting the sleeve band instructions. Once you have sewed up the side seam and underarm of the sleeve, fold the sleeve hem under by 5/8″. Press and pin in place.

Using a zigzag stitch or other stretch stitch of your choice, sew hem at 1/2″.

If you want to sew a long sleeved version, you will need a long sleeved pattern piece with a fitted sleeve. I used the Nikko pattern since it is a similarly fitted sleeve style. Put the Rio sleeve on top of the long sleeve pattern and line up the underarms.

As you can see the Nikko is slightly slimmer than the Rio. So I will just gradually blend from the Rio at the top to the Nikko at the wrist as shown below.

Now you just sew up as you did the short sleeved version, hemming at the wrist at 5/8″.

That is it. Simple right? Probably so simple that it didn’t need a whole blog post, but I love how this really easy change gets you a great crew neck pattern that is super versatile.