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PATTERNMAKING

PATTERNMAKING SEWING

LODO DRESS NEW SIZE RANGE

November 5, 2019

We are very excited to announce the launch of a new and improved size range for the Lodo dress sewing pattern. You can now purchase the Lodo in either a size range of 0 – 18 with a C cup or a size range of 14 – 30 and a D cup. The Lodo is our first pattern that has our new size range and we couldn’t be happier with the result. We are currently working on some of our other patterns behind the scenes and can’t wait to show those to you soon.

You may wonder how the size 14 – 30 version differs from the original size 0 – 18 design. The answer is not very much. Our size 14 – 30 size chart and block has a slightly more curvy set of dimensions than our size 0 – 18 block. As a result it is drafted for a D instead of a C cup (meaning a 4″ rather than a 3″ difference between your full and high bust) and has a 1″ larger difference between the waist and hip circumference. Both size ranges are drafted for an average height of 5’5″. You can see our new size chart below.

To accommodate the fuller bust on our new block, we added a bust dart to the 14 – 30 size range of the Lodo. Not only does this give you a bit more room in the bust area, but it also gives you a place to make adjustments for fuller or smaller busts if needed.

Other than the dart, the shape and design of the Lodo should look just the same as the 0 – 18 design. It has a subtle cocoon shape to the body of the dress, hitting a couple of inches above the knee for View B and mid-calf for View A. View A also has a center back slit for movability.

This updated and slightly more sophisticated version of a T-shirt dress is best sewn up in structured knits such as ponte, scuba, and double knit . with an approximate 25% amount of stretch. It’s an easy sew that we think is perfect for all of the holiday events coming up.

Both PDF size ranges for the Lodo are 20% off through Sunday, November 10th (no code needed). You can find the Lodo in both size ranges in our shop here.

MAKES PATTERNMAKING SEWING

LANDER ZIPPER EXPANSION PACK

March 12, 2018

Ever since releasing the Lander pants and shorts last year, I have been flooded with requests for a zipper option for this pattern. I am so excited to finally have it available for you with the Lander Zipper Expansion Pack.

If you have already sewn up the button fly option of the Lander pant, this expansion pack is perfect for you. I made sure to use as many of the same pattern pieces and instructions as possible so that this really is a natural extension of the original pattern. It is a bit more advanced than the button option, but I have provided detailed instructions, as well as some additional pattern pieces to make it as easy as possible.

 

One of my biggest pet peeves when sewing a zipper fly is shortening the zipper – especially metal ones. It’s the worst! So I made sure that all sizes use a standard size zipper (5″, 6″, or 7″). I prefer the metal jeans zippers, but you can also use the standard plastic ones if you prefer. The expansion pattern includes new pattern pieces for the right fly, left fly, and waistband, as well as a right fly extension to make sure that the zipper tucks into your pants nicely and is not visible when worn.

The expansion pack only comes as a pdf, but the print at home pattern is just 7 pages to tape, and there is a copy shop pattern included that works for both US and A0 printers.

 

Please note that you must have the original pdf or paper Lander pattern to make the zipper Landers. The expansion pack does not include all of the instructions or pattern pieces needed to complete the entire project.

You can find the pattern in my shop for purchase here.

PATTERNMAKING SEWALONG SEWING

NIKKO READY-TO-WEAR INSPIRATION

February 8, 2018

Turtlenecks are making a huge comeback this season so it was not hard at all to find inspiration for the Nikko in shops and online. I love how so many of these images include high waisted pants and skirts. This combo is definitely my go to outfit right now.

 

View A

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

View B

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

View C

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

View D

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

 

I hope these gave you some good ideas. I know that I am dying to make a a middie version like you see in so many of these images. Blog post for that coming soon!

If you would like to purchase the Nikko pattern you can buy the pdf version here or the paper pattern here. I will be back early neck week with fabric ideas and recommendations and the sewalong will begin on Monday Feb. 19th.

PATTERNMAKING SEWING

INTRODUCING THE NIKKO TOP AND DRESS SEWING PATTERN

February 5, 2018

I am so excited to introduce the newest True Bias sewing pattern, the Nikko Top and Dress. The Nikko is a mockneck knit pattern with four views. Views A and B are tops with a fitted silhouette that is perfect paired with high waisted pants (like the Landers) and skirts. Views B and C are ankle length dresses with a straighter fit through the waist and hips and side slits from the hem to the knee.

I have found the my Nikko tops have been my go to with winter layering. With lots of coverage but a slimmer fit, they are perfect under chunky cardigans and vests or tighter fitting jackets. It’s my winter tshirt. View A is sleeveless. The cut is similar to a racerback, but with just enough coverage to wear a regular bra. This view is especially great for transitional weather. View B is a long sleeved mock turtleneck. This is probably my most worn of all of my Nikkos. A simple black or striped long sleeved Nikko is perfect for almost any occasion. I love it with jeans for everyday, or tucked into a fitted short skirt with thick tights for something a bit more dressed up.

I love to wear my dress length Nikko with ankle booties and my leather jacket, although it’s also great with a maxi cardigan and a statement necklace. It fits with some ease in the waist and hips for some added comfort. It is not a body con dress. It’s flattering while still being easy to wear and move in.

The Nikko is an advanced beginner pattern. It’s super quick to make (think a tshirt without the difficult neckline) with the hardest part being hemming the knits. I suggest using some kind of knit hem tape such as HeatnBond soft stretch to make it easier, but we will go over that more during the sewalong. Fabrics for this pattern are knits with about 75% stretch. If you use fabric with less stretch than this you will have a hard time getting it over your head (I know from experience). I have found that my favorite fabric to use for the top is a bamboo knit. For the dress length I like a fabric that’s a bit less clingy so a rib knit is perfect for this. It has tons of stretch and recovery with the added thickness and coverage that the ribbing brings.

The Nikko Top and Dress is being released today as both a pdf and a paper pattern. You can find them both in my shop. I am also releasing the Ogden cami as a paper pattern today which you can find here.

I will be back during the next couple of weeks with ready-to-wear inspiration and also fabric recommendations. The official sewalong will begin in two weeks on Monday Feb. 19th.

I hope you love it as much as I do.

PATTERNMAKING SEWALONG SEWING

LANDER SEWALONG DAY 3 – DARTS AND POCKETS

September 20, 2017

I am super excited to get started today on actually sewing up our Lander Pants and Shorts. If you havn’t done so already, go ahead and cut out all of your pattern pieces from your fabric. Make sure that you also transfer all marking from your pattern pieces to your fabric. There are quite a few ways to do this. Generally I just make a small snip for all notches and use my Chalk pen for everything else. It keeps it simple. The darts should be marked on the wrong side our your fabric, and the back pocket markings should be marked on the right side of your fabric.

OK, let’s get going.

Step 1 – Fuse your interfacing to the wrong side of the curved edge of the front pocket pieces, the waistband, and the left fly. Make sure that your fly looks like the diagram in your instructions with the interfacing facing up. Otherwise you might fuse it to the wrong side of the fly and then the left fly will be backwards.

 

Step 2 – Before sewing, make sure that you have the correct needle in your sewing machine. Especially if your fabric is on the heavier side, you are going to want to use a heavy duty or even a jeans sewing machine needle. It will really make a difference when you are sewing through multiple layers of fabric.

Sew the darts on both back pieces and press the excess in towards center back. I really like using a tailor’s ham when I press darts because it supports the bulge that you just sewed. You can also use a rolled up towel.

 

Step 3 – Prepare your back pockets by folding the top down by 1/4”, wrong sides touching, and pressing.

Take the pressed edge and fold it again, right sides touching, at the two notches. Pin and press.

 

Step 4 – Starting at the top folded edge, backstitch and sew down one side of the pocket at 1/2” seam allowance. Once you get to the bottom corner, leave the needle down and pivot to sew along the bottom of the pocket, pivot again and sew up the other side. Backstitch at the end.

I know it is hard to make out in my navy fabric so here is a closeup of the top corner.

Clip the top corners to reduce bulk and flip the folded area right side out.

Once you turn the top, the two sides will begin folding in as well. Press each of the two side edges and bottom in at 1/2”, using the stitch line as a guide.

 

Step 5 – Make sure that the folded section on the top of the pocket is an even width and that each corner has a nice point. Pin and press. Edgestitch 1/8” from the fold.

Step 6 – Pin the side and bottom edges of the pockets to the back pant pieces where the markings indicate.

Judge me if you will, but I really like using a gluestick for this step. You can get fabric gluesticks or be like me and steal your kids washable gluestick from their art box. (I am going to edgestitch like the instructions tell you to do here, but I actually recommend that you baste the edges at this time and do the final edgestitching once you can try your pants on to make sure that you like the placement of the pockets). Edgestitch around the sides and bottom at 1/8”, backstitching at the beginning and end. Set your back pant pieces aside for now.

 

Step 7 – Trim about 1/16” off of the curved edge and two straight interior edges of the front pocket lining pieces. This will help the lining to roll to the inside after stitching, making sure it is not visible on the finished garment.

 

 

Step 8 – With right sides touching, pin the curved edge, and the two straight interior edges of each front pocket to its coordinating pocket lining. Since the lining is a bit smaller, the main pocket will bubble a bit. Don’t worry about that.

Stitch. Leave the top and outside edges unstitched. Don’t worry if it’s still pulling a bit at this time. Once turned right side out it will be fine.

 

Step 9 – Trim the stitched seams to reduce bulk. Clip the corner and curved edge so that they turn well.

Turn the pockets right side out and press. The lining should not be visible from the right side.

If you are still having problems with the lining being visible, you can pinch a bit of the lining out using a straight pin and then press. It will leave some extra fabric in the lining, but once it is all stitched down you won’t notice at all. It’s more important that you don’t see the lining on the front of the garment.

Edgestitch the curved edge of each front pocket at 1/4”. Press.

 

Step 10 – Pin the pockets to the fronts, matching notches.

Edgestitch around the two straight edges of the front pockets at 1/8”.

Increase your stitch length and baste the top and side of the pockets to the front pant just to make it easier when assembling the rest of the pant or short.

 

OK, that’s it for today. Lot’s of fun progress already. I hope you are loving how they turn out. Comment or email me with questions and tomorrow we will pick up where we left off and we will tackle the crotch and fly.